Tag Archives: Education Accountability Act

South Carolina public school funding 2009-2010

South Carolina Public School Funding

Many parents (and even many lawmakers) are confused about the size and scope of public spending on government schools in South Carolina.

Money for public schools comes from three sources (local, state, and federal taxes) and filters down to the classroom through a convoluted array of “programs” and “categories” leaving a mere 43 cents per dollar for classroom instruction.

Regular Voice readers will  recall that in South Carolina there is no discernible correlation between per-student funding levels and student achievement, and that real School Choice is the only proven reform that will both save money and improve student achievement.

All that said, many parents and taxpayers are still surprised to hear that public schools across South Carolina will be funded at an average of $11,242 per child this year. Compare that to just $8,500 last year in North Carolina.

From the South Carolina Appropriations Bill for fiscal year 2009-2010:

The base student cost for the current fiscal year for Part IA has been determined to be $2,034 and the base student cost for Part III has been determined to be $300 for a total base student cost of $2,334. In Fiscal Year 2009-10, the total pupil count is projected to be 691,816. The average per pupil funding is projected to be $4,153 state, $1,296 federal, and $5,792 local. This is an average total funding level of $11,242 excluding revenues of local bond issues.

Here is the district-by-district listing of local, state, and federal allocations for each of the 85 public school districts:

In Fiscal Year 2009-10, the Abbeville School District total pupil count is projected to be 2,911. The per pupil funding is projected to be $6,059 state, $1,616 federal, and $3,604 local. This is a total projected funding level of $11,279 excluding revenues of local bond issues.

In Fiscal Year 2009-10, the Aiken School District total pupil count is projected to be 23,640. The per pupil funding is projected to be $4,084 state, $1,225 federal, and $3,673 local. This is a total projected funding level of $8,982 excluding revenues of local bond issues. Continue reading

Rumsey: it’s time to stand up for the children

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A grave injustice

By ANNA MARIE RUMSEY – Guest Columnist, State Newspaper, (5/13)

A grave injustice is being done by so-called leaders of the black communities. By trashing Sen. Robert Ford’s support of the private-school choice bill, they systematically tear down any chance of advancing children’s education and ignore the fact that South Carolina’s education system is not able to serve students in any meaningful way.

We spend millions of dollars yearly in support of a system that at best is socially promoting students in the poorer counties. Where do these students end up? On the welfare rolls, unable to read, relegated to menial jobs that do not allow them to support their families. And so the cycle repeats itself, generation after generation.

Sen. Ford’s private-school choice bill might effectively serve some of these children, and who are the first ones that rage against it? Those very same “leaders.” Shame on you. You have the chance to show your backbone like Sen. Ford did and say “Enough is enough,” but instead, you send those children with the greatest needs back to the status quo. Continue reading

EOC: South Carolina’s $1.8 Billion Barney Fife

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South Carolina Education Oversight Committee (EOC) full-time staff are the keystone cops that let State Superintendent Jim Rex get away with all his crazy high-dollar antics!

South Carolina’s monolithic public schools are home to some of the lowest test scores and highest drop out rates in the entire country.

Even the “best” public schools in the state are totally uncompetitive with similar schools in other states.

This despite years of chaotic but massive funding growth, with total per-student spending now over $11,400.

But the the famed “Educational Accountability Act” (EAA) of 1998 was supposed to change all that. When the EAA was passed it was portrayed as a model of high standards and transparency, and was considered by some as influential in the passing of the subsequent federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The basic function of the EAA was to create the Education Oversight Committee (EOC), a new government bureaucracy to serve as the “watchdog” of student achievement standards. Continue reading